REVISTA

Identificación de los circuitos espinales que transmiten y controlan el dolor mecánico

Descripción: Descripción bioquímica y fisiológica a través de manipulaciones genéticas con carácter investigativo de las vías nociceptivas motoras, sus componentes y su mecanismo de acción

TITULO FUENTE ORIGINAL:

Identification of spinal circuits transmitting and gating mechanical pain

AUTORES:

Bo Duan, Longzhen Cheng, Steeve Bourane, Olivier Britz, Christopher Padilla, Lidia Garcia-Campmany, Michael Krashes, Wendy Knowlton, Tomoko Velasquez, Xiangyu Ren, Sarah Ross, Bradford B Lowell, Yun Wang, Martyn Goulding, Qiufu Ma

REVISTA ABREV.:

Cell

AÑO:

2014

REFERENCIA:

159(6):1417-1432

DOI:

10.1016/j.cell.2014.11.003

RESUMEN ORIGINAL:

Pain information processing in the spinal cord has been postulated to rely on nociceptive transmission (T) neurons receiving inputs from nociceptors and Aβ mechanoreceptors, with Aβ inputs gated through feed-forward activation of spinal inhibitory neurons (INs). Here, we used intersectional genetic manipulations to identify these critical components of pain transduction. Marking and... + Leer más

Pain information processing in the spinal cord has been postulated to rely on nociceptive transmission (T) neurons receiving inputs from nociceptors and Aβ mechanoreceptors, with Aβ inputs gated through feed-forward activation of spinal inhibitory neurons (INs). Here, we used intersectional genetic manipulations to identify these critical components of pain transduction. Marking and ablating six populations of spinal excitatory and inhibitory neurons, coupled with behavioral and electrophysiological analysis, showed that excitatory neurons expressing somatostatin (SOM) include T-type cells, whose ablation causes loss of mechanical pain. Inhibitory neurons marked by the expression of dynorphin (Dyn) represent INs, which are necessary to gate Aβ fibers from activating SOM(+) neurons to evoke pain. Therefore, peripheral mechanical nociceptors and Aβ mechanoreceptors, together with spinal SOM(+) excitatory and Dyn(+) inhibitory neurons, form a microcircuit that transmits and gates mechanical pain

- Leer menos

ENLACES DE INTERÉS

Enlace al pdf de acceso libre: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC[...]