REVISTA DESTACADA

Patofisiología y valoración del dolor por cancer (1)

Descripción: Primera parte de una revisión centrada en la patofisiología y valoración del dolor producido por cancer en perros y gatos

TITULO FUENTE ORIGINAL:

Elements of Oncology: Strategies for Managing Cancer Pain in Dogs & Cats Part1: Pathophysiology & Assessment of Cancer Pain

AUTORES:

Rancilio N, Ko J, Fulkerson CM

REVISTA ABREV.:

TVP Journal

AÑO:

2015

REFERENCIA:

May-June

RESUMEN ORIGINAL:

Welcome to Elements of Oncology—a column that will address the many components of diagnosing, managing, treating, and monitoring veterinary cancer patients. This column begins with a series of two articles that describe strategies for cancer pain management in dogs and cats, with an overall goal of raising awareness among the veterinary community about treating cancer pain early and... + Leer más

Welcome to Elements of Oncology—a column that will address the many components of diagnosing, managing, treating, and monitoring veterinary cancer patients. This column begins with a series of two articles that describe strategies for cancer pain management in dogs and cats, with an overall goal of raising awareness among the veterinary community about treating cancer pain early and recognizing that cancer pain can be quite different from other types of acute or chronic pain.
Cancer pain is one of the most common, overlooked, and undertreated comorbidities in human patients. In a recent retrospective study of more than 1000 patients presenting to a radiation oncology service for palliative treatment of bone metastasis, over 25% had pain that was inadequately managed before initiation of radiation therapy.1
Other surveys and systematic reviews of the human literature estimate that the prevalence of inadequate pain management among all humans with cancer approaches 50%.2-4 Although the incidence of untreated or undertreated cancer pain among veterinary patients is unknown, it is most likely similar or even higher.
Unrecognized or undertreated pain that progresses from acute to chronic in oncology patients can lead to treatment failure, death,5 or premature euthanasia despite treatment of the cancer itself. The longer a cancer patient’s pain is ongoing, the more difficult it becomes to successfully treat both the underlying cancer and the pain.

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